2022 CL Scale Nats

Cl Scale Nats

Cl Scale Nats

By Fred Cronenwett | clscale7@gmail.com
 
As seen in the November 2022 issue of Model Aviation.
 
 Mike McHenry, with his first-place Fun Scale P-39 and his first-place 1/2A Scale P-39, and Steve Kretschmer, with his first-place Sport Scale P-39. L-R): Mike McHenry, with his first-place Fun Scale P-39 and his first-place 1/2A Scale P-39, and Steve Kretschmer, with his first-place Sport Scale P-39.
 

THE 2022 CONTROL LINE (CL) SCALE NATS, held July 15-17, had much better weather compared with last year, so we were able to get in all four rounds. However, the weather forecast on Sunday did not look promising, so all flights were flown on Friday and Saturday.

The big change for this year was that FAI F4B was flown in place of Authentic Scale. The static judging was also done at a distance of 5 meters, which converts to 16.4 feet with the revised F4B rules.

Peter Bauer and Allen Goff were the event directors this year. Peter used an Excel spreadsheet to calculate all of the scores instead of adding them up manually one at a time. The spreadsheet allowed the scores to be entered from the judging form, and then everything was automatically compiled, with the information input into the summary page. It made the job of figuring out the final scores much faster than doing it manually.

F4B Changes

The revised F4B rules that were used are similar to Sport Scale (AMA 509) in that they are judged from a distance. The F4B models are no longer judged up close. Stan Alexander noted in the F4B meeting on Friday night that, although the model is not judged up close as in the past, you still want to have a detailed cockpit for an F4B entry to earn maximum points.

The revised rules also allow for 2.4 GHz to be used instead of only allowing down-the-line electronic controls or three-line for throttle control. You can now use three-line, down-the-line electronic controls, or 2.4 GHz with the new rules.

Steve’s P-39 is shown in flight with the gear coming up. The model used 2.4 GHz power for the flaps, drop tank, retractable landing gear, and electric motor control. Steve’s P-39 is shown in flight with the gear coming up. The model used 2.4 GHz power for the flaps, drop tank, retractable landing gear, and electric motor control.

This is the handle that Steve used with his P-39. He repackaged a 2.4 GHz transmitter and moved all of the parts into a new box. This is the handle that Steve used with his P-39. He repackaged a 2.4 GHz transmitter and moved all of the parts into a new box.

The plan is to have the team trials in 2023 for the 2024 FAI F4B Scale team for the F4 World Championships for Scale Model Aircraft. If you are interested, bring your best model and come prepared. You should keep in mind that the model must be able to be shipped in a box to its final destination if you are selected for the World Championships team.

The documentation that is required for F4B is quite different from the AMA event. The three-view has to be a minimum size and pictures must be a certain size. Color chips are expected to define the color of your aircraft. Be prepared to have the judges remove the color chip from the documentation package. The judges will look at the back of the color chip to see if it was obtained from an acceptable source.

You can order the Federal Standard color chips or get them from Iliad Design. Iliad also has decals for plastic model builders. I have found much documentation from Scale Aircraft Modelling magazine, including three-views and color plates that cater to plastic models.

Sport Scale

Weeks before the Nats, there was only one entry in Sport Scale (AMA 509), but there were three last-minute entries that brought the number of models to four. Because the final score is based upon the average of the two best flight scores and the average of the static score (from two judges), it came down to the flight scores to determine how pilots would place at this year’s Nats.

James Sawata flew his Miss Los Angeles racing airplane, which was built by Steve, in Fun Scale. James Sawata flew his Miss Los Angeles racing airplane, which was built by Steve, in Fun Scale.

Peter Bauer’s Demoiselle F4B entry during round two. Peter Bauer’s Demoiselle F4B entry during round two.

Steve Kretschmer flew his highly detailed P-39 to earn first place and the High Static award, despite making some rough landings that damaged the model. During the first flying round on Friday afternoon, the airplane ended up on its belly with damage to the landing gear, but Steve was able to get it repaired Friday night and in good enough condition to fly on Saturday. His flight for round two on Saturday morning scored quite well. With his 90 static points and second-round and third-round flight scores, he beat Peter Bauer by five points.

Fun Scale

This event came down to the flying score because there was no difference in the static points across all of the entries. Mike McHenry had two exceptionally good flights that put him in the lead, eight points in front of James Sawata. James flew his electric-powered Miss Los Angeles racer, which was built by Steve, to a second-place finish.

F4B

There were two entries this year for F4B, with Allen Goff and Peter Bauer flying in the event. Peter flew a Demoichelle, while Allen Goff flew his Nieuport 11. Because the Demoichelle is an ultralight, Peter had to get creative on where to put items such as the receiver and the wires. The receiver was put inside the dummy pilot’s body. Allen took first place in F4B and Peter placed second.

Because this was the first time that F4B took place under the new rules, it was a learning experience from the pilots’ viewpoint, as well as how to run the F4B contest. The lessons learned from this year will be used for the 2023 F4B Team Trials. The date and the location for the Team Trials have not been set as of this time.

The 2023 Nats will be here before you know it, so figure out which events you want to enter. Determine what options you are going to select before you arrive and practice them so that you have a clean presentation for the judges.

The number of awards that are available is based upon the number of entries several weeks before the Nats start.

Land softly!

SOURCES:

National Association of Scale Aeromodelers (NASA)

www.nasascale.org

FAI Sporting Code

Section 4 – Aeromodelling, Volume F4: Flying Scale Model Aircraft

www.fai.org/sites/default/files/sc4_vol_f4_scale_22.pdf

Facebook Twitter Share

Add new comment